November 18th, 2011

The Look Ahead: Emanuel Ax, Via Colori, WHAM 2011, Speed-the-Plow, White Snake and Imprinting the Divine

The weekend is upon us and this one seems to be particularly busy. Between the Coffee Porter Release party and all the visual arts displays around town, you’re going to find it difficult to fit everything in. Don’t worry, we’re right there with you. Time to take a glance at what to do starting… now.

Emanuel Ax at Jones Hall

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Where: Downtown – Jones Hall [615 Louisiana St., 77002]
When: Friday, November 18th | 7:00PM
How much: $25 to $123
Scoop’d from: Richard

“Houston Symphony favorite Emanuel Ax returns performing Mozart’s majestic Piano Concerto No. 25. Also on the program is Argentinean composer Osvaldo Golijov’s Last Round, which was created in homage to the great tango master, Astor Piazzolla. You’ll be mesmerized by a piece that evokes the sensuality of the Argentinean tango.”

Golijov: Last Round
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 25*
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 3*

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Winter Holiday Arts Market 2011

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Where: Arts District [2101 Winter Street, 77007]
When: November 18th, 19th and 20th | 7:00PM
How much: $20 on Friday Sneak Peek; Free for the Weekend
Scoop’d from: Alexander

“Head to Winter Street Studios for Spacetaker’s 6th Annual Winter Holiday Art Market (WHAM), a weekend art sale and celebration of Houston’s talented and diverse artists, this November 18 – 20, 2011. Get an exclusive sneak peek of the art at Friday night’s WHAM Preview Party. Tickets are $20 ($10 for Spacetaker members) and will be available for purchase beginning November 1. The remainder of the weekend is free and open to the public.”

Via Colori 2011

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Where: Downtown — Sam Houston Park [1100 Bagby St., 77002]
When: November 19th and 20th | Starts at 10:00AM
How much: Free for the Public
Scoop’d from: Alexander

We made it out to Via Colori 2010, and we can’t stress enough that you should make plans to attend this year. The event is free, yet it raises money for one of our favorite non-profits, The Center for Hearing and Speech. Check out last year’s photo essay. Hopefully we’ll have a 2011 edition for you next week.

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Speed-the-Plow by David Mamet at The Country Playhouse

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Where: Piney Point Village Area [12802 Queensbury Ln., 77024]
When: Friday and Saturday November 18th and 19th | 8:00PM
How much: $19 to $22
Scoop’d from: Richard

“David Mamet’s biting satirization of the American movie industry presents the Hollywood rat race at its worst.”

Starring:
Trevor B. Cone as BOBBY GOULD
Jacob Millwee as CHARLIE FOX
Mischa Hutchings as KAREN

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Classical Theatre Company Reading Series: White Snake

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Where: West University — Brazos Bookstore [2421 Bissonet St., 77005]
When: Monday, November 21st | 6:30PM
How much: Free to the Public
Scoop’d from: Paul/Email

“The Classical Theatre Company presents the first installment of this year’s Reading Series with a staged reading of an adapted Chinese myth, White Snake. The reading will be presented on Monday, November 21st at 7:00pm at the Brazos Bookstore. A pre and post wine reception and holiday shopping open house will accompany the reading starting at 6:30pm.The event is free and open to the public.”

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Imprinting the Divine at the Menil Collection

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Where: Montrose — The Menil Collection [1515 Sul Ross, 77006]
When: Through March 18th
How much: Free to the Public
Scoop’d from: Paul/Email

“The Menil’s collection of Byzantine icons is widely regarded by scholars in the field as one of the most important of its kind in the United States. The group of more than sixty works, many of which were acquired by Dominique de Menil in 1985 from the noted collector Eric Bradley, spans six-hundred years, from the 13th to the 18th centuries, and encompasses a number of distinct cultures including Greek, Slavic, and Russian. Taking the diversity of the collection into account, “Imprinting the Divine: Byzantine and Russian Icons from the Menil Collection” examines these works not in an attempt to situate them within a particular context, but rather to explore how they were designed to transcend time and place.”

— The Loop Scoop

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